The Last Hurrah

Well it’s been encouraging to meet people from something like 40 different countries, who are all interested in the convergence of language learning and technology. If you’d like more info on the conference, see http://www.eurocall2007.com

Today was the last day, and after a series of sessions, we did take a sightseeing trip, and it did my heart glad to see the coast of ireland again, and to see a castle up close and wander about in it.

This particular castle was Dunluce castle, on the northwest coast of ireland.

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There happened to be a few knights left from the days of the original castle, who were demonstrating:

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The walk down towards the castle as it stands today:

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And this is how the castle would have looked. (Compare the two)

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This was pretty impressive, the window frames in stone; at first I thought it was original stonework that had survived; while it turns out that these particular window frames were reconstructed to demonstrate what it would have been like, it is still impressive.

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And this is a closer look at the model, so see how it would have repeated throughout the frame of the “manor house”.

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The next place we went after Dunluce Castle was the Giant’s causeway, an interesting formation of rock, what something like crystal stones, hexagonal shaped, pushing up. It’s a bit of a walk down the hill; interestingly, it turns out that UNESCO, an entity affiliated with the United Nations, had identified this area as one needing protection, presumably from developers, so it is a completely untouched stretch of coastline with absolutely no development whatsoever.

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Here is the someday to be Dr. Kelsey sitting atop some orthogonal or hexagonal or somethingonal rock formations.

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And here are the rock formations a bit closer.

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And we leave you with a view of pre-Dr. Kelsey, (who stayed up too late the night before making the final file sets for the translations of the laptop how-to notes on the wiki page, in spanish, french, portuguese, hindi, thai, arabic and amharic — http://wiki.laptop.org/go/542_Demo_Notes) — and the odd rock formations.

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